Arconic

close

play

The world of the Jetsons gets a scientific makeover.
Arconic has reimagined the year 2062 through the eyes of leading futurists, our engineers and filmmaker Justin Lin.
1962
2062
The Jetsons sci-fi cartoon series launched in 1962 and was set 100 years in the future. An instant hit, it presented an entertaining yet surprisingly forward-thinking vision of 2062.
It’s amazing to see how much The Jetsons got right, predicting things like smartwatches, tablets and 3D printing; and that made us wonder what else might still be in store. Flying cars? Extraordinary buildings?
So we gathered a brain trust of leading futurists and our own engineers to share their thoughts on what Arconic could help realize by 2062, and brought their vision to life with the help of film director Justin Lin.

Brain Trust

MEET THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT
When I heard about this project I thought that it would be exciting to be part of the legacy of something that was part of my childhood and to reimagine that.

JUSTIN LIN — DIRECTOR

play

We’re seeing greater efficiencies in planes that are more like flying wings.

ADRIAN HON — FUTURIST

play

Driverless vehicles are going to change transportation more dramatically than the invention of the automobile itself.

THOMAS FREY — FUTURIST

play

There’s no limit to how tall we’re going to make the showcase buildings.

KEVIN KELLY — FUTURIST

play

We would have to be able to utilize the materials and elements that are located on other planets.

SHERRI McCLEARY — ARCONIC ENGINEER

play

Flying cars
Sitting at the intersection of automotive and aerospace, could flying cars simply be autonomous drones which have been extended to carry people? Could lift be provided by directional electric fans powered by powerful supercapacitors and batteries, which in turn could even be charged by a small gas turbine generator? Additional control and drag reduction might come in the form of plasma actuators.
augmented reality
What if displays of information and images were no longer confined to screens? AR and VR – Virtual Reality has the potential to become a much bigger part of our everyday lives, helping us work, study, play and communicate.
ARCHITECTURE
As 3D printing and topology optimization become possible at real scale, we may see new buildings that look like nothing we see today; fewer buildings that look boxy and rectangular, and more that have flowing, organic forms like those we see in nature. Architects could be free to be able to think more like artists, and less like engineers.
green spaces
As cities become more populated, what if green spaces were incorporated into buildings as places to relax or even grow food? Strong, lightweight materials will be crucial, as well as coatings to manage the effects of the biological matter and water on the structure.
mars rover prototype
There is speculation that many of us will journey to Mars within the next 50 years, and advanced materials and additive manufacturing could make a vital contribution to that mission. Theoretically, using minerals from the Martian surface, we might be able to 3D print some of the necessary equipment and components on Mars, avoiding the need to haul them all the way from Earth.
big data
In the future, aircraft, automobiles and buildings could have sensors built-in that are constantly monitoring their environment and watching for signs of damage or degradation. Should a part appear to be failing, a central system could warn all other vehicles that are being exposed to similar operating conditions.

01

The Future Takes
Shape

02

Reimagining the World of The Jetsons

03

The Future of
Air Travel

04

The Future
of Cars

05

The Future of Cityscapes

06

The Future of
Space Exploration